Tag: Measure Branching

Compare Multiple Metrics Cumulatively In Power BI Using Advanced DAX

I’ve previously showcased how you can compare your actual results versus your budgeted results using advanced DAX. But, what if you also wanted to overlay some time comparison information so you’re comparing your actuals versus budget versus last year? Or perhaps versus last quarter? Or against any other time period you may want to select?

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Developing Sensitivity Analysis Logic Using DAX in Power BI

Sensitivity Analysis Logic Using DAX in Power BI

We’re getting specific today and really showcasing the analytical power of Power BI. Sensitivity analysis, or even running some ‘what ifs’ around this, allows you to almost predict what may happen in the future with your results. In this example, I want to see what will happen to my profitability if I am able to

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Forecasting in Power BI: Compare Performance vs Forecasts Cumulatively w/DAX

Compare Performance vs Forecasts Cumulatively with DAX

Showcasing results cumulatively is, in my opinion, the best way to showcase trends in your data. When comparing data versus budget or forecasts, showing the trends or divergence in trend is essential. You want to make sure you can identify when your performance is breaking down as soon as possible and by viewing this cumulatively

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Power BI Trend Analysis: Are Margins Expanding Or Contracting?

In this blog post, I will be diving into a relatively specific insight by conducting a Power BI trend analysis. By walking through exactly how I got there, you will learn so much about what you can do with Power BI and DAX. I really dive into this concept of measure branching, which I love

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Calculating Percent Profit Margins Using DAX In Power BI

Working out your profit margins in Power BI with a basic data set can seem like it requires a few steps. Maybe you think you need to use calculated columns to get the result. Well, you certainly don’t need to do that. There is a much simpler way. Using measures, you can start with simple

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